Photography Workflow Part 4 – Sharing, Printing, and Publishing

After going through the previous articles in this series, all of your photos should be in a single Lightroom catalog.  It’s the central repository of your work. Now that the images are in their resting (archived) place, it’s time to export a few to the world. Continue reading Photography Workflow Part 4 – Sharing, Printing, and Publishing

Photography Workflow Part 3 – Lightroom Tagging & Edits

In this part, we are finally getting into Lightroom.  This is my program of choice to keep my entire photo library organized.  Some editing techniques require integrating Photoshop, but Lightroom is great for general processing and cataloging. Continue reading Photography Workflow Part 3 – Lightroom Tagging & Edits

Photography Workflow Part 1 – Intro & The Hardware

You capture an epic moment.  Eager to show it to the world, you race home, copy the photos to a random folder, and toss up a quick edit to social media.  Success!  People like it.

The next weekend you capture another epic moment.  Eager to show it to the world, you race home, copy the photos to another random folder, and toss up a quick edit to social media.  Success!  People like it.

Repeat this cycle for months (or maybe years).  People love your work, and your photo library is growing. Continue reading Photography Workflow Part 1 – Intro & The Hardware

The Importance of Leveling Photos

Keeping the camera level is easy when there is a visible horizon, but not so much when shooting action (maybe even with misleading points of reference).  That’s what happened when I was shooting a snowmobile race held on a steep slope – I found myself leveling to the rider, and not the terrain.

Since the extreme-factor of this event is the steepness, leveling out the slope doesn’t look as good, and I had to correct almost every image in post.  Some of them did not have enough space to avoid over-cropping.  Thankfully Photoshop has a way to fill-in missing parts in a couple quick steps. Continue reading The Importance of Leveling Photos

Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

So far in my journey through photography, I have shot with a Canon T3i and Canon 7D Mark II.  I have rented the 5D Mark III a couple times, but mostly have been a user of crop-sensor bodies.  When shooting with the smaller sensors, it’s helpful to use glass made for crop bodies, like the Sigma 17-50 2.8 or the Canon 55-250 IS STM II.  But there are other lenses I have like the Tamron 150-600, where a full-frame sensor could make better images.

In this brief overview, I’m going to share what it’s like to shoot with this camera alongside the 7D II.  There will be little comparisons across other manufacturers, like Nikon or Sony.  It’s true that you can squeeze another megapixel or two, slightly more DR, etc. from competing cameras.  But I wanted a body that played nice with the equipment I already had.

Continue reading Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

Yellowstone Nov 5: Lamar Valley to Canyon

The weather has been so nice this late in the season, I decided to camp the last weekend the south roads were open. I wanted to hike around Lamar Valley on Saturday, so I stayed at Mammoth instead of Lewis Lake, which was also open. Last time I stayed up here was in February. I made it to a site at around 8:30.

Continue reading Yellowstone Nov 5: Lamar Valley to Canyon

Can Instagram improve your photography?

In the above cover image, one of my images (that bear & wolf pic)  was trending #2 in the very popular #yellowstone hashtag.  This was even the same time that Nat Geo was releasing images from their Yellowstone edition magazine.

Pretty much as soon as I started to care about photography, I was looking for ways to get my work out there.  Instagram seemed to be a worthy platform to share my content with the world and get instant feedback.  As I used it more and more, I found it helping me improve in several ways.

Continue reading Can Instagram improve your photography?